How to Calm a Cat Down at Distress

Cats are independent creatures! They do not need or want human intervention when they are feeling down. It would help if you never tried to pick up a cat that feels distressed, as this might upset them even more. Instead, you can help calm your cat down by providing a safe enclosed space for them to go to and use the litter box if necessary. You can also offer some food or water if they have been fasting during their time of distress. If the cat is too stressed out and cannot find a place on its own, it helps to softly talk with the animal and offer it petting with care.

What is Distress?

Distress is defined as a state of mind where the individual feels overwhelmed and alone. This may be due to something they have gone through or are currently going through, or it could be due to some fear that the person has acquired over time.

Symptoms of cat distress include pacing around in circles, hiding under furniture, frequently meowing without stopping for breath, appearing withdrawn from its surroundings by flattening its ears back against its head, dilated wide-open pupils, excess salivation or frothing at the mouth, arching its back up high while hissing loudly with tail puffed out straight while taking small steps away from whatever is scaring them (usually people), and finally, frantic licking of themselves which can cause hair loss if done excessively.

What are the Causes of Distress?

Several factors can contribute to a cat’s distress state. They can be internal, something that only the cat itself will realize, or external factors, including everything outside of the cat’s body. Some external factors include being too hot or too cold, being left alone for long periods, being in an unfamiliar place for an extended period, etc…

Of course, there are also many types of stressors within a cat’s mind due to its natural hunting instincts. For example, when it comes time for the mating season, male cats tend to experience excessive anxiety because they are constantly trying to find their next mate while avoiding other males. If a cat is continuously feeling anxious, it can eventually lead to miserable and distressing times when they are home alone.

How to Tell if Your Cat is in Distress:

Cats in distress will usually show visible signs such as pacing in circles, hiding under furniture, frequently meowing without stopping for breath, appearing withdrawn from their surroundings by flattening their ears back against their head, dilated wide-open pupils, excess salivation, or frothing at the mouth, arching its back up high while hissing loudly with tail puffed out straight while taking small steps away from whatever is scaring them (usually people), and finally, frantic licking of themselves which can cause hair loss if done excessively.

How to Calm a Cat Down at Distress:

If your cat is in distress, it might be a good idea to provide them with an enclosed space that they can get into and feel safe, such as a small room or a large cupboard. If the place you have provided for them has a litter tray inside of it, this will help soothe their minds even more because they know what to do if they need to use the bathroom. If your cat does not kindly enter any enclosed space, then another option would be to provide food or water. The most important thing is that you do nothing to chase your cat away from whatever area(s) they are occupying because this could make things worse instead of better.

FAQs:

How do I know for sure if my cat is in distress?

A: There are several signs you can look out for when trying to determine whether or not your cat may be suffering from distress. Sudden mood swings, excessive pacing around the house, hiding under furniture instead of their favorite spot on your lap, meowing excessively without stopping for breath, appearing withdrawn by flattening their ears back against their head, dilated wide-open pupils, excess salivation, or frothing at the mouth, arching its back up high while hissing loudly with tail puffed out straight while taking small steps away from whatever is scaring them (usual people), and finally frantic licking of themselves which can cause hair loss if done excessively.

How does my cat show that they are enjoying life?

A: Cats that are happy with their surroundings will usually have constricted pupils, which indicates that they are relaxed, calm, and content and purring when petted by familiar people. If you see all of these signs, then it is likely your cat is not distressed or anxious in any way. However, suppose you notice the opposite, such as dilated pupils instead of constricted ones along with flattened ears back against the head. In that case, this usually means your cat is experiencing some distress or anxiety.

What kind of problems can arise if I leave my cat to fend for themselves during times of distress?

A: Several issues could come about if you choose to leave your cat alone during a time of distress or anxiety instead of trying to provide them with a safe place to go. For example, some cats may try and climb over fences, causing them to get stuck on top of the wall while hanging by their claws, which can be incredibly painful for them. Your kitty might even escape from your home entirely if they are too stressed out, but this means that you will have no idea where they could be heading to. In addition, many distressed cats will neglect eating food and drinking water because these needs become secondary when compared to the general feeling of stress they are experiencing at that moment.

Is there anywhere I should never put my cat to calm it down?

A: If your cat is in distress, you should never try to pick them up and put them in a confined space such as a wardrobe or cupboard, so do not attempt this with your pet. It would be best to avoid physical contact with your kitty until they have calmed down and reverted to their usual self again.

Conclusion:

In conclusion, if your cat is feeling distressed, then you should provide them with a safe enclosed space for them to go to and use the litter tray if necessary. You can also offer some food or water if they have been fasting during their time of distress. If the cat is too stressed out and cannot find a place on its own, it helps to softly talk with the animal and offer it petting with care.

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